Colin P Davies


VOICES


For twenty-five years Colin P Davies has been a reliable (if not perhaps prolific) contributor to the science fiction and fantasy magazines and his stories have been anthologised, dramatised, pod-cast and broadcast on radio. The stories in his first collection Tall Tales on The Iron Horse were described as “well-plotted, crisply told, and thoroughly engaging” - Alvaro Zinos-Amaro (The Fix)

In Voices the author has selected twenty of his favourite stories, including

The Girl with the Four-Dimensional Head

The Girl with the Four-Dimensional Head by Colin P Davies is excellent. This is not another goofy, pulpy tale, but a gritty sci-fi drama with fully drawn characters, outstanding dialog, and an interesting take on the old standby setting of Mars” - Michael Gabriel Bailey (Tangent Online)

The Defenders

The Defenders by Colin P Davies expertly dissects colonialism in quintessential science-fictional terms” - Nick Gevers (Locus)

Short, effective, and providing a solid emotional payoff, this is a great short story” - Jason B Sizemore (Apex Digest)

together with four previously unpublished tales

Ferry Day

When memories are no longer enough

In a Two-Dimensional World it’s Okay to be Shallow

Which was lucky for Hank the Hound

Rapta Adapta

In a world of acronyms, can you trust your CHUM?

Voices

After a long lonely winter, a blind man waits for the Voices to return


THE STORIES...

Babel 3000

Ferry Day

An Honourable Race

Clifford and the Bookmole

The Fighter

Land of Fire and Ashes

Perhaps a Goddess

Good and Faithful Servant

In a Two-Dimensional World it’s Okay to be Shallow

The Certainty Principle

Happy Halloween

The Mailbox

Voices

The Defenders

The Booby-Trapped Boy

The Evangelist

Stippleback

The Girl with the Four-Dimensional Head

David Yeung Remains

The Hay Devils

Rapta Adapta

All the Right Words

Substitutes

Julian of Earth   


REVIEWS


The Fighter

When the police shut down his car and pull him over Dominick thinks he must have been speeding in “The Fighter” by Colin P. Davies. Dominick is the longest surviving fighter in the league according to the chip in his head and what the police say. He will kill inside or outside of the ring if he has to and isn’t in the mood to deal with the police officers. He just wants to get home to his family. That had been the plan before they stopped him and things began to go wrong for all involved.

A quick, fast read that plays with reality in the form of what we think we know as opposed to what reality truly is for everyone else. Perceptions shape reality for everyone and Dominick is sure what is going on every step of the way.

Kevin R. Tipple - Tangent

"The Fighter" in the story by Colin P. Davies is Dominick, headed home after killing his opponent in the ring, something he was supposed to do. He is stopped by two police officers for a reason we do not know at first. We find out in this nicely-done little tale.

Sam Tomaino - SFRevu

Substitutes

Substitutes” is an eerie tale. Whatever the affliction Melinda is under, it has affected her mental capacities. Her father reacts how I’d imagine most people would react, angrily and fearfully. The brief tales plays out like a Stephen King premise, clones stalk the pair as they run to new homes. An increasingly desperate father gets more violent with every encounter.

I really liked this story. Liked it so much I was disappointed that it ended so quickly. Add 80,000 words as good as these 2000 and it would make a great novel.

Frank Dutkiewicz - Diabolical Plots

Julian of Earth

Davies’ story has something of a Lost World feel to it and the mysterious alien species, the Primes, who inhabit Niselle V are intriguing for the reader because Tarn himself knows very little about them and thus the reader discovers facts right along with Tarn, Anna and the film crew. Issues of how one culture sees another are lit upon briefly through the story but in the end it is a story about Tarn’s self-discovery and it acts as a really solid pulp-inspired adventure tale.

Carl V Anderson - My Favorites of 2013 - SF Signal

"Julian of Earth" by Colin P. Davies. Tarn Erstbauer lives with his mother on Niselle V and runs a tour bus based on a legend about a warrior called Julian of Earth. When he was eight, Tarn claimed he was kidnapped by this Julian, "the legendary imperial soldier who would not accept that the war had been over for a decade". Julian had killed a native (called a prime) and taken over his brood. After 27 hours, Tarn had returned home with his story, which had become a legend. Now a woman named Anna Walcot-Winter has arrived and wants to be find Julian, her great-grandfather. All is not what it seems in yet another good story.

Sam Tomaino - SFRevu

Colonists on an alien planet is the central trope in “Julian of Earth” by Colin P. Davies. Tarn Erstbrauer is one of the colonists on Niselle V. He runs a tour that is based around the legend of Julian who was “the legendary imperial soldier who would not accept the war had been over for a decade…continue to fight against the revolutionaries." Julian supposedly lives in the jungles of Niselle V and is helped by the rarely seen native species. Tarn was kidnapped as a child by Julian and retells his story over and over as a guide. A trio of wealthy documentarians engages his services to see the places that he visited during his abduction. This unveils secrets (from the documentarians as well as Tarn) as to the truth of the story.

This one is a solid piece of extrapolation with very human characters that keep you reading.

Bob Blough - Tangent

Julian of Earth” by Colin P. Davies is great fun to read. Tarn Erstbauer is a young man who makes his living — barely — by showing offworlders around the jungle that surrounds the home he shares with his mother. He trades on a story of his abduction as a child by Julian, a legendary soldier who organized raids from the center of a jungle the settlers never penetrated with the help of the native species, the primes. One day a small group of tourists arrives, promising riches to Tarn if he will help them find Julian and film the search for a documentary. All of them find much more than they were looking for. The story isn’t particularly original, but it is enjoyable.

Terry Weyna - Fantasy Literature

The Certainty Principle

In "The Certainty Principle" by Colin P. Davies, John Hale has been dishonorably discharged after an incident on Mars involving the "vat-born", people he does not consider human. Hale is staying in a place to get away from all of the furor. As the story develops, we learn about what happened and Hale learns something, too. This was an effective well-written story.

Sam Tomaino - SFRevu

Babel 3000

In Colin P. Davies’s “Babel 3000,” Smith collects “new old words” and presents them at fashionable dinner parties, where they are all the rage. But he’s having trouble keeping up with the fashions, and somehow, the words don't suffice any more to fill the emptiness inside.


"Babel 3000" is a wistful tale, told with subtlety. The futuristic setting is merely suggested with a few deft strokes, rather than painted in detail. In his society and in Smith himself, Davies offers the impression of a hollow state, of a shiny veneer that covers a core stripped of meaning and substance. Yet there is hope, in a single, whispered word.

Kimberly Lundstrom - Tangent


Land of Fire and Ashes

In "Land of Fire and Ashes" by Colin P. Davies, Castello is an archeologist, exploring the ruins of Pompeii, in a future Earth devastated by a terrorist attack. Things had gone wrong and he is besieged by monsters, preventing him from getting back to his shuttle. He is helped by an "angel" who seems to be a lot like his son Giuliano who had been killed in a fire when Castello had left him alone for a short time. Castello is convinced his problems are the result of sabotage. Who would want to kill him? The answer is a good one.


Sam Tomaino - SFRevu

Stippleback

Stippleback’ from Colin P. Davies told us about the massacre of swamp creatures. One of them survived and then went on a mission of revenge but in doing so it became entangled in the politics of life in an archaic kingdom. What would be the outcome? A simple but effective story with a curious outcome.

Rod MacDonald - SF Crowsnest

The Evangelist

Jesus Santana, “The Evangelist,” immediately brings to mind Father Ramon Ruiz-Sanchez from James Blish’s masterpiece A Case of Conscience. The setup here is conceptually similar—an envoy of Christian theology attempting to inculcate the otherworldly natives—though the alien harbingers are nothing like Blish’s Lithians, which is a good thing. As soon as the story gets under way, Davies makes the harbinger’s planet, the icy Benedict’s World, entirely his own territory, both in terms of plot and narration. We’re treated to plenty of action (some violence) but Davies doesn’t lose sight of his metaphysical commentary. I was not able to guess the ending, despite all the clues subtly planted in the text. For anyone who enjoys the ups of down and the downs of up, “The Evangelist” should be both a tasty and tasteful affair.


Alvaro Zinos-Amaro - The Fix


The Defenders
"For such a brief story, Davies encompasses a wide range. 'The Defenders' brought to mind a comment by John Clute (in reference to both James Tiptree Jr and the underrated Kris Neville) 'A capacity to develop the sometimes routine initial material of a story so that its implications expanded constantly...' Tiptree did this with breathtaking ease, and Davies displays a similar ability here"

Chris Markwyn - Tangent